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John D. Gallagher | Mike Hannay | Lachlan Mackenzie | Dirk Siepmann

Writing in English: A Guide for Advanced Learners

Verfügbarkeit: Auf Lager

Lieferzeit: 2-3 Tage

EAN/ISBN
9783838536002
2. 2011

Details

This book offers practical advice and guidance to German-speaking undergraduates and academics who aspire to write in English. It also provides valuable assistance to editors, examiners and teachers who conduct English courses for intermediate or advanced students.

It consists of four modules and is rounded off with a subject index and a glossary. Making extensive use of authentic texts, the authors adopt a contrastive approach and focus on the major problems encountered by Germans writing in English.

This second edition has been revised, updated and expanded to include, among other things, a new section on coordination and listing as well as new lexico-grammatical material that writers can put to immediate use and benefit.
  • Siepmann/Gallagher/Hannay/Mackenzie: Writing in English: A Guide for Advanced LearnersCOVER
  • ImpressumIV
  • ContentsV
  • Preface to the Second Edition1
  • Preface1
  • Introduction9
  • The four modules10
  • Writing strategies13
  • Using the book14
  • Module I Organizing ideas into text17
  • Introduction17
  • Chapter 1 The term paper: gearing up to start writing19
  • 1.1 The term paper as an argued text19
  • 1.2 The three processes of planning, writing proper and editing21
  • 1.3 Making the plan22
  • 1.4 Using a computer27
  • 1.5 Conclusion33
  • Chapter 2 Different types of term paper: Two models34
  • 2.1 Term paper as essay or as mini-article34
  • 2.2 Quotation and paraphrase35
  • 2.3 The literary essay41
  • 2.4 The linguistic mini-article47
  • Chapter 3 Title, Introduction, Body and Conclusion57
  • 3.1 The Title57
  • 3.2 The Introduction59
  • 3.3 The Body sections63
  • 3.4 Paragraphs within the Body sections65
  • 3.5 The Conclusion72
  • Chapter 4 Getting the paper ready for submission: Editing and formatting75
  • 4.1 Editing75
  • 4.2 Formal requirements78
  • Introduction83
  • Module II Building effective sentences83
  • Chapter 1 Basic issues in sentence construction85
  • 1.1 Sentence construction85
  • 1.2 Information packaging89
  • 1.3 Sentencing92
  • 1.4 Overview96
  • Chapter 2 Information packaging98
  • 2.1 Basic grammatical moulds99
  • 2.2 The order of information in the clause103
  • 2.3 Organizing the starting point109
  • 2.4 Establishing a special kind of starting point: framing125
  • 2.5 Organizing the end point129
  • 2.6 What goes wrong in clause construction137
  • 2.7 Overview142
  • Chapter 3 Complex sentences143
  • 3.1 Different kinds of sentence144
  • 3.2 Clause combining: the basic forms148
  • 3.3 Foregrounding and backgrounding160
  • 3.4 Complex framing162
  • 3.5 Interruption techniques168
  • 3.6 Elaborational techniques175
  • 3.7 Coordinating and listing180
  • 3.8 Problems with sentence length186
  • 3.9 Review190
  • Chapter 4 Punctuation192
  • 4.1 Commas 1: the principle of semantic unity193
  • 4.2 Commas 2: optional use199
  • 4.3 Colons207
  • 4.4 Semicolons211
  • 4.5 Dashes and brackets215
  • 4.6 Commas revisited: dealing with comma splices218
  • 4.7 Overview220
  • III Lexis and Grammar Module225
  • Introduction225
  • Chapter 1 A constructional view of language226
  • Chapter 2 Academic lexis and patterning233
  • 2.1 Nouns and noun patterns234
  • 2.2 Adjective patterns251
  • 2.3 Prepositions and prepositional phrases256
  • 2.4 Verbs and verb patterns260
  • 2.5 The interface between verb patterning and sentence-building268
  • Chapter 3 From word to collocation272
  • 3.1 Words, words, words273
  • 3.2 How words go together280
  • 3.3 Collocation of semantic-pragmatic features286
  • 3.4 Collocational gaps and incompatibilities290
  • 3.5 Making creative use of collocation291
  • 3.6 The interplay of collocation and patterning293
  • Chapter 4 Rhetorical moves and their lexical realizations298
  • 4.1 Stating your topics and objectives298
  • 4.2 Reporting, summarizing and paraphrasing302
  • 4.3 Expressing opinions and criticizing314
  • 4.4 Enumerating ideas and changing the topic320
  • 4.5 Topicalizing specific items329
  • 4.6 Exemplification330
  • 4.7 Comparison and contrast336
  • 4.8 Concession366
  • 4.9 Cause, reason and explanation375
  • 4.10 Consequence and result391
  • 4.11 Static relations393
  • Module IV Style398
  • Introduction398
  • Chapter 1 Style and stylistic competence399
  • 1.1 What is style?399
  • 1.2 How to achieve stylistic competence400
  • 1.3 Academic style402
  • 1.4 From non-specialist to specialist text411
  • 1.5 Personal style412
  • Chapter 2 The principles of style417
  • 2.1 Aptness418
  • 2.2 Clarity422
  • 2.3 Concision431
  • 2.4 Variety438
  • 2.5 Elegance448
  • A final word458
  • Glossary460
  • Index464