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Felicitas Macgilchrist

Academic Writing

Verfügbarkeit: Auf Lager

Lieferzeit: 2-3 Tage

EAN/ISBN
9783838540870
1. 2014

Details

Englisch schreiben für die Uni? Studierende und Promovierende müssen wissenschaftliche Texte immer häufiger auf Englisch schreiben.

Dieses englischsprachige Buch hilft mit authentischen Formulierungen aus den Sozial-, Geistes- und Naturwissenschaften. Es bietet praktische Ratschläge für das Schreiben zentraler Textsorten wie Hausarbeiten, Laborprotokolle, Essays, Abschlussarbeiten, Exposés und wissenschaftliche Poster.

Die übersichtlichen Tipps helfen kompetent und souverän auf Englisch zu schreiben.
  • Academic Writing1
  • Imprint 4
  • Contents5
  • 1 Introduction7
  • 1.1 Genre awareness: Conventions, contexts and creativity7
  • 1.2 Academic collectives8
  • 1.3 How to use this book9
  • 2 General writing conventions13
  • 2.1 Key structures: Writing with paragraphs and topic sentences13
  • 2.2 Key directions: Using signposts15
  • 2.3 Key persons: Writing ‘I’, ‘we’ or the passive voice17
  • 2.4 Key actions: More verbs, less nouns18
  • 2.5 Key genders: Using gender-inclusive language19
  • 2.6 Key sources: Citing other research20
  • 3 Abstracts: Summarizing your study23
  • 3.1 OHE: Observe – Hypothesize – Experiment23
  • 3.2 Abstracts: The five-finger pattern in science24
  • 3.3 Abstracts: Five-finger patterns in the humanities29
  • 3.4 The language of opening sentences33
  • 3.5 The language of aims and objectives35
  • 3.6 The language of methods38
  • 3.7 The language of findings40
  • 3.8 The language of conclusions and implications41
  • 3.9 An example from the field43
  • 4 Introductions: Beginning your paper47
  • 4.1 The general ‘moves’ of academic Introductions47
  • 4.2 The specific ‘steps’ of academic Introductions52
  • 4.3 Establishing and occupying a niche53
  • 4.4 Writing hypotheses60
  • 5 Empirical research papers67
  • 5.1 IMRAD67
  • 5.2 Methods68
  • 5.2.1 Methods: Chunks, structure and grammar68
  • 5.2.2 Methods: Fast and slow descriptions71
  • 5.3 Results73
  • 5.3.1 Results: Reporting and highlighting results74
  • 5.3.2 Results: Beginning with the visual material75
  • 5.4 Discussion76
  • 5.4.1 Discussion: Four important moves77
  • 5.4.2 Discussion: Restating, summarizing, interpreting and linking78
  • 5.5 Figures81
  • 6 Theoretical, interpretative and analytical writing87
  • 6.1 Developing an argument88
  • 6.2 Selecting relevant information from sources89
  • 6.3 Establishing your position I: Finding an authorial ‘voice’89
  • 6.4 Establishing your position II: Engaging with sources93
  • 6.4.1 Evaluation: Appraising with individual words93
  • 6.4.2 Attribution: Making claims more and less subjective94
  • 6.4.3 Endorsement: Supporting or not supporting sources’ claims96
  • 6.4.4 Modality: Expressing certainty and uncertainty97
  • 6.4.5 Concessions: Acknowledging alternative arguments98
  • 6.5 Presenting your argument in a coherent manner102
  • 6.5.1 Structure102
  • 6.5.2 Signposting103
  • 6.5.3 Citing and Referencing106
  • 6.6 Conclusions107
  • 7 Posters: Visualising your Abstract113
  • 7.1 The purpose of posters113
  • 7.2 Attractive, compelling and professional114
  • 7.3 How much information?118
  • 7.4 Titling your poster120
  • 7.5 Including images, diagrams and graphs122
  • 7.6 Using clear language126
  • 8 Research proposals: Making plans for future studies131
  • 8.1 A basic model structure132
  • 8.2 Stating objectives and research question(s)133
  • 8.3 Stating potential significance136
  • 8.4 Research design and methods137
  • 8.5 Expected results140
  • 8.6 Research limitations141
  • 8.7 References, timetable and appendices142
  • 8.8 Common pitfalls144
  • 9 Diverse genres: Lab reports, thought papers, short essays, reviews147
  • 9.1 Lab reports147
  • 9.1.1 Elements of lab reports148
  • 9.1.2 Key language features of lab reports149
  • 9.2 Short essays152
  • 9.2.1 Elements of short essays153
  • 9.2.2 Key language features of short essays155
  • 9.3 Thought papers158
  • 9.3.1 Elements of thought papers158
  • 9.3.2 Key language features of thought papers159
  • 9.4 Case reports163
  • 9.4.1 Elements of case reports163
  • 9.4.2 Key language features of case reports164
  • 10 Further resources173
  • 10.1 Continuing alone173
  • 10.2 Continuing in groups174
  • 10.3 Academic vocabulary online174
  • 10.4 Further online resources176
  • 10.4.1 General writing skills and academic language176
  • 10.4.2 Empirical academic writing (life sciences, physical sciences, social sciences)177
  • 10.4.3 Extended and short essays (arts and humanities, social sciences)177
  • 10.4.4 Posters178
  • 10.4.5 Research proposals178
  • 10.4.6 Lab reports178
  • 10.4.7 Thought papers179
  • 10.4.8 Case reports179
  • References181
  • Register191